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DISCLAIMER:

These “Fecal Transplant At Home – DIY Instructions” are based on the experiences of one person, the anecdotal reports of others and questions most frequently asked by  e-Patients. They are not medical advice. And FMT is still considered an experimental procedure without known future consequences.
Please read the disclaimer and discuss your options with your doctor before doing fecal microbiota transplant (FMT). It is critical that your doctor test your donor before FMT. An outwardly healthy person could carry an asymptomatic parasite or blood borne illness that could wreak havoc in your fragile system.

After the Big Day

How many times should you do your fecal transplant?

There isn’t enough research to be sure.  Consult your doctor to see if they have recommendations for your particular health condition.  Rule of thumb among the people in our group has been the following:

  • Clostridium Difficile (C.diff) tend to get positive results within 1-3 transplants.
  • IBS & SIBO tend to get positive results within 3-10 transplants
  • IBD tend to get positive results if they use it daily for a few weeks or a month, then taper off to once a week and then once a month.  There are several protocols being used by doctors/clinics.  Take a look at Taymount and Newbery Clinics for successful strategies.
  • People with other health issues will need to experiment.  This is an experimental procedure so we don’t have all the answers.  One option is to look up your condition on Google Scholar and include the term fecal transplant to see if any research has been done on FMT and your health condition.

After Your First Fecal Transplant

  • Do not do any special pre-treatment diets/antimicrobials after the first FMT, unless you are instructed to do so my your physician.
  • Only continue the Imodium if you are having trouble holding in the FMT.
  • If you suffer from food intolerances and react to the donor’s food, use less FMT or ask your donor to modify their diet. A little used frequently is better than a lot used occasionally.
  • A high fiber diet will help grow your new microbiota in some people, but don’t overdo it. Not all fibers agree with all people. Continue with your regular diet in the first days of fecal transplants, then slowly add in fiber foods to see how you react.  Experiment until you find the right ones.
  • Only take a fiber supplement if you cannot get enough fiber through your diet. If you have IBD you will need to go easy on the fiber until your gut wall can cope, and then introduce it only slowly.
  • Do not use starchy fibre if your condition is autism or ME/CFS.  Research is showing that these conditions produce too many fatty acids (and possibly the wrong kind) from their microbiome.  You do not want to feed your new FMT microbiome starch if you have those conditions as it may encourage the wrong bacteria to grow.
  • If you have food intolerances don’t try anything that isn’t a known safe food (or supplement), for at least 3 months after FMT and then only introduce slowly.
  • If you experience die-off or side effects, try a liver tonic to support your liver which may be under pressure from the readjustment occurring in your gut.
  • If you suffer from intestinal permeability (leaky gut) try one of the repair formulas available. It might take a few to find one that has the right mix of ingredients for you. Perm-a-Vit and Intestinew have a good mix of gut healing ingredients. Customised formulas are also available from some naturopathic practitioners.
  • Get your zinc levels tested and make sure they are on the high side of normal. ZInc is essential for healing. Zinc Lozenges are better than tablets as they bypass the digestive system.
  • If you have IBD, read the Briggs Protocol which contains a step by step gut repair strategy.
  • If FMT doesn’t work for you, try a different donor or investigate factors that might be disrupting growth of the new flora.

Recent Posts

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What is C.diff?

C.difficile, also called C.diff or CDI (Clostridium difficile infection), is a bacterial infection of the intestinal tract.  The infection causes watery diarrhea and cramping....
Fecal Transplant Books
A Practical Guide to Fecal Transplants
DISCLAIMER:

These “Fecal Transplant At Home – DIY Instructions” are based on the experiences of one person, the anecdotal reports of others and questions most frequently asked by  e-Patients. They are not medical advice. And FMT is still considered an experimental procedure without known future consequences.
Please read the disclaimer and discuss your options with your doctor before doing fecal microbiota transplant (FMT). It is critical that your doctor test your donor before FMT. An outwardly healthy person could carry an asymptomatic parasite or blood borne illness that could wreak havoc in your fragile system.